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Superslayer taking on antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Dr Katharina Richter is a visionary leader in MedTech, acclaimed for innovation and gender diversity. With over 40 awards to her name, including MIT Innovator Under 35 Asia-Pacific, and Prime Minister’s Prize for New Innovator finalist, she has shattered barriers as an entrepreneur, scientist, and ‘superbug slayer.’ Katharina’s groundbreaking work in combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria has resulted in 6 innovative treatments, 3 of which are patented, offering hope against deadly infections.

SAHMRI Celebrates 10 Years of Research

SAHMRI represents an exciting and unique statewide concept, bringing together basic and translational research, South Australia’s three universities and the health system. SAHMRI works in collaboration with its partners to provide a clear focal point for health and medical research, including paving the way for new partnerships, innovative research projects and improved health outcomes.

Executive Director, Professor Maria Makrides spoke to Australian Health Journal about 3 achievements in the past 10 years that have had significant impact

International leadership breakthroughs in leukaemia research
Culturally appropriate Indigenous health research and clinical care
Omega 3 fatty acids as a preterm birth prevention

RESEARCH IMPACT SAHMRI, SOUTH AUSTRALIA (2023)

South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, also known as SAHMRI has had significant impacts in various areas over the past ten years, and this year is celebrating its 10 year anniversary with a week of events.

Ahead of the anniversary, Executive Director, Professor Maria Makrides spoke to Bench Side Story about 3 achievements in the past 10 years that have had significant impact

World-first clinical trial improves patient outcomes for kidney transplants (2023)

A world-first clinical trial conducted at the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH) and at hospitals across Australia and New Zealand has identified the best fluid treatment to reduce the risk of patients requiring dialysis after a kidney transplant.

Around one in three people who receive a kidney transplant suffer delayed graft function, which means the transplant doesn’t work immediately and they require dialysis.

The lead-author of the study, was Royal Adelaide Hospital Nephrologist and University of Adelaide researcher, Dr Michael Collins.

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